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Christian Limon, is with the Marcus Family Law Center, PLC, in El Centro (founded in 1974). She brings a comprehensive set of skills and expertise to assist her clients. She is licensed as an attorney both in Mexico and California, with her international practice in Imperial County and Mexicali. Her emphasis is family law, including cross-border custody and family support issues. Christian is also experienced in cross-border contracts and bi-national litigation (civil, commercial, family, and labor), advising several US companies in Mexico, including real estate development and maquiladora operations. Christian is a Spanish/English interpreter with a focus on legal documents and legal proceedings, as well as a California Notary. She is a member of the California BAR, Imperial County Bar Association, ANADE (Mexican Association of Corporate Attorneys) and AEM (Mexican Entrepreneurs Association).

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New trade deal USMCA to fuel invasion of Asian manufacturers

Chinese participation in the auto parts sector alone rose 350% in 10 years!

The Unite States Senate overwhelmingly approved a revised North American trade pact, USMCA, in a rare bipartisan vote that hands President Trump a victory on a key campaign promise just as lawmakers are preparing his impeachment trial.

The U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA, passed by a vote of 89-10. The trade pact, signed by the president in November 2018, received a similar bipartisan vote in the House last month.

A statement by the White House press secretary called the measure “another trade win for American workers,” replacing “the job-killing, huge failure NAFTA.”

“USMCA, which the President successfully negotiated over a year ago, re-balances trade between the three countries and will lead to significant economic and job growth in the United States,” the statement said.

As a benefit to Mexico, ratification of the new North America free trade agreement,USMCA, will trigger an invasion of Chinese auto parts manufacturers in Mexico, according to experts.

Ratified also by Mexico in December USMCA stipulates that 75% of automotive content must be made in the three countries in order for a vehicle to qualify for tariff-free status in the region.

That figure is 12.5% higher than that set by the rules of origin under the 25-year-old NAFTA, which will be replaced by the USMCA once all three countries have completed their ratification processes.

The aim of the higher content rule is to reduce the quantity of parts that manufacturers operating in North America use from countries such as China, India, Brazil and eastern European nations. By opening factories in Mexico, Chinese auto part manufactures will be able to circumvent the stricter rule.

Once the USMCA is in effect, Chinese companies will seek to increase the quantity of parts they make in Mexico, said Enrique Dussel, coordinator of the Center for China-Mexico Studies at the National Autonomous University (UNAM).

A number of Chinese auto parts makers have already established operations in Mexico, such as Minth, which supplies Nissan, Ford, Honda, Mazda, Audi, Fiat Chrysler and General Motors. Chinese investment in Mexico’s auto parts sector increased by almost 350% between 2008 and 2018 to just over US $6 billion.

In 2019, Hangzhou XZB Tech opened a new factory in Nuevo León and Minghua started operations in San Luis Potosí.

A supplier of a range of parts to Audi, Ford and General Motors, the former invested US $9 million in a plant in a new industrial park in the municipality of Salinas Victoria, located north of the state capital Monterrey. The company has plans to expand its facility to 20,000 square meters, the newspaper El Universal reported.

Minghua, which supplies BMW from its San Luis Potosí plant, will invest 633 million pesos (US $33.9 million) in a factory in Puebla, El Universal said, to supply parts to Volkswagen and Audi.

In addition, the Zacatecas government has announced the construction of a new industrial park for Chinese auto parts manufacturers and is currently in talks with Guangdong Automotive Component with a view to luring the company to the state.

Arturo Orozco, a professor at the IPADE Business School and director of its auto summit, said the new North American trade deal gives greater certainty to the automotive industry and provides the opportunity to attract more Chinese suppliers to Mexico.

Orozco added that Mexico is also an attractive country in which to make auto parts because wages in China have risen in recent years and continue to rise. Exporting to automakers in the United States from Mexico is easier and cheaper due to the country’s proximity to the U.S. and the trade war between Washington and Beijing.

The president of Mexico’s auto parts industry association INA said that Chinese companies are anxious to start operations in Mexico.

Only the beginning

Given USMCA’s strong beginning, in addition to Chinese automobile manufacturing companies other sectors of industry will follow. The future of Mexico is, in addition to its agricultural and tourist industries, in addition to the automotive sector, other multinational companies in other sectors will set up shop in Mexico.

Ex-Mexican Security Secretary García Arrested in USA

Former Mexican federal security secretary Genaro García Luna has pleaded not guilty to U.S. charges that he colluded with the Sinaloa Cartel in a drug trafficking conspiracy.

García, who led the so-called war on drugs launched by Calderón (and years ago by the USA) shortly after he took office in 2006, was indicted on December 4 by a grand jury in Brooklyn on charges that he allowed the Sinaloa Cartel to operate in exchange for multimillion-dollar bribes. He was detained in Dallas, Texas, on December 9 2019.

Mexico’s head of security in the government of former president Felipe Calderón entered his plea on Friday during a brief appearance in federal court in Brooklyn, New York. The case is U.S. v. Garcia Luna, 19-cr-00576.

The once high-ranking Mexican official will remain locked up at least until a bail hearing to be held as soon as Jan. 21, U.S. Magistrate Judge Peggy Kuo said. Prosecutors on Friday said they’d challenge any future request for bail, citing Garcia Luna’s wealth and connections to the cartel.

Garcia Luna, who moved to Miami in 2012, became a target for U.S. prosecutors after a former Sinaloa cartel leader testified about his alleged involvement at El Chapo’s trial last year in Brooklyn. El Chapo was sentenced to life in prison. Garcia Luna was indicted by a federal grand jury on Dec. 4, 2019 and arrested days later in Dallas.

Federal prosecutors say Garcia Luna cleared the way for multi-ton shipments of cocaine and other drugs into the U.S. In addition to his cabinet-level position under President Felipe Calderon, Garcia Luna also served as the first head of Mexico’s Federal Investigation Agency when it was created in 2001.

The former official’s assistance was so crucial in facilitating large drug shipments into the U.S. that Sinaloa operatives twice personally delivered to him briefcases filled with $3 million to $5 million in cash, the U.S. said.

After his move to Miami, Garcia Luna allegedly lied about his past criminal conduct on a 2018 naturalization application, the U.S. said.

The 51-year-old, who prior to serving as public security secretary, headed up the now-defunct Federal Investigation Agency, allegedly provided the cartel with security that allowed it to freely move drugs to the northern border and supplied confidential information about government investigations and other criminal organizations.

The U.S. indictment said that Sinaloa Cartel bagmen personally delivered payments on two occasions to García using briefcases that contained between US $3 million and $5 million.

Former Sinaloa Cartel operations chief Jesús Zambada said at drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán’s New York trial last year that he personally gave García US $6 million in the mid-2000s.

United States prosecutors also said that the former official lied about his past criminal involvement when he applied for U.S. citizenship in 2018.

Dressed in khaki pants and a baggy gray sweatshirt, García appeared to be suffering from the strain of his almost month-long imprisonment during his 10-minute appearance in court.

His face was drawn and his demeanor submissive, as he constantly turned around to look in the direction of his wife and two children who were seated in the second row of a packed courthouse. Maybe he and his family understand that he is facing the same sentence as El Chapo – a life imprisoned under solitary confinement.

García shook his head as the charges against him – three counts of cocaine-trafficking conspiracy and a false declarations charge – were read out by prosecutors.

Judge Peggy Kuo said he will remain in custody unless a court accepts a proposal for bail. Prosecutors said that they would oppose any such request because García’s wealth and alleged cartel links make him an extremely high flight risk.

Another procedural hearing was set for January 21, 2020 after which García will have a period of 70 days within which he may choose to change his plea. If convicted, García faces a prison sentence of between 10 years and life in solitary confinement.

In Mexico, federal financial investigators are looking into the possible embezzlement of more than 4.8 billion pesos (US $250 million) in federal funds to companies with links to García. Former president Calderón has denied any knowledge of the alleged criminal activities of his security secretary.

President López Obrador, who blames Mexico’s ongoing violence problems on the security strategy first implemented by the Calderón administration, said on December 18 that his government wouldn’t investigate the ex-president in relation to the charges against his security secretary “because it would create the perception that we’re doing it for political purposes.” It’s more likely that Obrador lives a life of terror under Mexico’s drug cartels, who are in virtual control of Mexico.

El Chapo’s tunnels live on

Former Sinaloa Cartel leader Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán may be out of the picture but his tunnel-building legacy lives on.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) reports that El Chapo’s tunnels are still commonly used for drug smuggling in the border towns in which the cartel operates, such as Tijuana, Mexicali and Nogales.

The most recent tunnel discovery was made by the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) on December 19, 2019. It crossed the border from Nogales, Sonora, into Río Rico, Arizona.

The U.S. government named it Tunnel 125, the number being the running count of functioning tunnels discovered since 1990. Another 119 unfinished tunnels have also been discovered since then.

In the three years since El Chapo’s arrest, U.S. border forces have found 35 passageways, primarily in Baja California and Sonora, the route the Sinaloa Cartel has used since the 1990s.

All the tunnels discovered in Mexicali, Tijuana and Tecate are first class with lighting, ventilation, electric elevators and steel rails for the carts used to move drugs.

Discovered in April 2016, the longest tunnel seized so far ran 800 meters from Tijuana to San Diego, according to California officials.

Nogales is considered the cradle of drug tunnels, as U.S. border forces discover an average of one per month there, either in use or under construction.

On August 23, 2018, a tunnel task force operated by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) discovered a tunnel running from a fast food restaurant near Yuma, Arizona, to a house in San Luis Río Colorado, Sonora. The owner of the Arizona property was arrested for possession of US $1 million worth of methamphetamines, cocaine, heroin and fentanyl.

U.S. Army engineers will design technology to detect tunnels this coming year and the U.S. Congress has approved the $2 million the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) requested for the project.

In a speech to the U.S. Senate in April, Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agent Timothy J. Tubbs said the corrupting ability of the cartels is extensive and has its tentacles in both Mexico and the United States.

Tubbs said the primary drug-running organizations are the of Sinaloa, Jalisco New Generation and Zetas cartels, whose sourcing operations extend as far as Asia.

Tubbs also said that DHS deployed 1,700 special agents and 180 intelligence research specialists on the U.S.-Mexico border in response to the smuggling.

In 2018, HSI investigations led to 4,562 criminal arrests, 3,523 indictments, 3,173 convictions and 153 administrative immigration arrests.

Tubbs praised the collaborative relationship between the two countries in its ability to take down targets such as “El Chapo” Guzmán.

“Mexico has proven to be an outstanding partner in the fight against [transnational criminal organizations], taking down the cartels’ top leadership and helping in efforts to dismantle these organizations,” he said.

Tunnel master Guzmán, whose most famous project was the 1.5-kilometer tunnel that led him to freedom from the Altiplano penitentiary in México state in 2015, is serving a life sentence in Colorado after being convicted in July on drug, murder and money laundering charges.

Will El Chapo tunnel out of the Colorado prison, just like he did in Mexico?

Stay tuned…

Mexico Travel Advisory: Level 2: Exercise increased caution, December 17, 2019

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Exercise increased caution in Mexico due to crime and kidnapping. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Violent crime – such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery – is widespread.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to certain areas is prohibited or significantly restricted.

U.S. government employees may not travel between cities after dark, may not hail taxis on the street, and must rely on dispatched vehicles, including from app-based services like Uber or from regulated taxi stands. U.S. government employees may not drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico, with the exception of daytime travel within Baja California, between Nogales and Hermosillo on Mexican Federal Highway 15D, and between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey on Highway 85D.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

Do Not Travel To:

  • Colima state due to crime.
  • Guerrero state due to crime.
  • Michoac?n state due to crime.
  • Sinaloa state due to crime.
  • Tamaulipas state due to crime and kidnapping.

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Chihuahua state due to crime.
  • Coahuila state due to crime.
  • Durango state due to crime.
  • Jalisco state due to crime.
  • Mexico state due to crime.
  • Morelos state due to crime.
  • Nayarit state due to crime.
  • Nuevo Leon state due to crime.
  • San Luis Potosi state due to crime.
  • Sonora state due to crime.
  • Zacatecas state due to crime.

For detailed information on all states in Mexico, please see below.

If you decide to travel to Mexico:

  • Keep your traveling companions and family back home informed of your travel plans. If separating from your travel group, send a friend your GPS location. If taking a taxi alone, take a photo of the taxi number and/or license plate and text to a friend.
  • Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving alone or at night. In many states, police presence and emergency services are extremely limited outside the state capital or major cities.
  • Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Mexico.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Aguascalientes state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees.

Baja California state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence occur throughout the state. Particularly notable is the number of homicides in non-tourist areas of Tijuana. Most homicides appeared to be targeted; however, criminal organization assassinations and turf battles can result in bystanders being injured or killed.

Due to poor cellular service and hazardous road conditions, U.S. government employees may only travel on Highway 2D between Mexicali and Tijuana during daylight hours.

There are no additional restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Baja California, which includes tourist areas in: Ensenada, Rosarito, and Tijuana.

Baja California Sur state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence occur throughout the state, including in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents related to criminal organization turf battles. Petty crime occurs frequently in tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Baja California Sur, which includes tourist areas in: Cabo San Lucas, San Jose del Cabo, and La Paz.

Campeche state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime. Police presence and emergency response are extremely limited outside of the state capital.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Campeche state, which includes tourist areas in: Campeche City, Calakmul, Edzna, and Palizada.

Chiapas state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Chiapas state, which includes tourist areas in: Palenque, San Cristobal de las Casas, and Tuxtla Gutierrez.

Chihuahua state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and gang activity are common. The vast majority of homicides are targeted assassinations against members of criminal organizations. Battles for territory between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens and U.S. government employees, including restaurants and malls during daylight hours. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents.

U.S. government employees may only travel to the following locations within the state of Chihuahua and with the noted restrictions:

  • Ciudad Juarez: They may travel at any time to the area of Ciudad Juarez bounded to the east by Bulevar Independencia; to the south by De los Montes Urales/Avenida Manuel J Clouthier/Carretera de Juarez; to the west by Via Juan Gabriel/Avenida de los Insurgentes/Calle Miguel Ahumada/Francisco Javier Mina/Melchor Ochampo; and to the north by the U.S.-Mexico border.

Additionally, direct travel to the Ciudad Juarez airport and the factories (maquilas) located along Bulevar Independencia and Las Torres is permitted. Travel to the factory and cattle inspection station in San Jeronimo is permitted only through the United States via the Santa Teresa port of entry; travel via Anapra is prohibited.

  • Chihuahua City: Employees may travel at any time to the area of Chihuahua City bounded to the north by Avenida Transformaci?n; to the east by Avenida Tecnol?gico/Manuel G?mez Morin; to the west by the city limit boundary; and to the south by Route 16/Calle Tamborel.

U.S. government employees may only travel from Ciudad Juarez to Chihuahua City during daylight hours via Highway 45, with stops permitted only at the Federal Police station, the overlook, the border inspection station at KM 35, and the shops and restaurants on Highway 45 in the town of Villa Ahumada.

Additionally, travel is permitted to factories (maquilas) outside this area via the most direct route. Direct travel to Abraham Gonzales International Airport is also permitted.

  • Nuevo Casas Grandes Area (including Nuevo Casas Grandes, Casas Grandes, Mata Ortiz, Colonia Juarez, Colonia LeBaron, and Paquime): U.S. government employees may only travel to the Nuevo Casas Grandes area during daylight hours through the United States, entering Mexico at the Palomas Port of Entry on New Mexico Route 11 before connecting to Mexico Highway 2 to Nuevo Casas Grandes. Employees are permitted to stay overnight in the cities of Nuevo Casas Grandes and Casas Grandes only.
  • Ojinaga: U.S. government employees must travel to Ojinaga via U.S. Highway 67 through the Presidio, Texas Port of Entry.
  • Palomas: U.S. government employees must travel to Palomas via U.S. highways through the Palomas Port of Entry in Columbus, New Mexico.

Mexican authorities in Chihuahua occasionally operate at a heightened level of security, sometimes referred to as “Alerta Roja” (Red Alert). During those periods, U.S. government personnel must receive prior approval and exercise increased caution when visiting Mexican law enforcement offices or installations.

Travel by U.S. government employees to all other areas of the state of Chihuahua, including Copper Canyon, is prohibited.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Coahuila state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and unpredictable gang activity are common in parts of Coahuila state.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Piedras Negras and Ciudad Acu?a: U.S. government employees must travel directly from the United States and observe a midnight to 6:00 a.m. curfew in both cities.
  • Highway 40 and areas south within Coahuila state.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Coahuila.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Colima state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime.

Violent crime and gang activity are widespread.

U.S. government employees may not travel to:

  • Tecoman
  • Within 20 km of the Colima/Michoacan border
  • Highway 110 from the town of La Tecomaca to the Jalisco border

In Manzanillo, U.S. government employees are limited to the tourist and port areas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Durango state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Durango state.

U.S. government employees may not travel to the area west and south of Highway 45.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Guanajuato state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Gang-related violence occurs in Guanajuato, primarily in the south of the state, near the border with Michoac?n. This violence is often linked to the organized theft of petroleum and natural gas from the state oil company and other suppliers.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees.

Guerrero state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime.

Crime and violence are widespread. Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers.

U.S. government employees may not travel to the entire state of Guerrero, including Acapulco, Zihuatanejo, Ixtapa, and Taxco.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Hidalgo state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees.

Jalisco state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Jalisco state. In metropolitan Guadalajara, battles for territory control between criminal groups take place in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents between criminal groups have injured or killed innocent bystanders.

U.S. government employees may not travel to:

  • Within 20 km (12 miles) of the Jalisco/Michoac?n border, south of Route 120
  • Highway 80 south of Cocula
  • Highway 544 from Mascota to San Sebastian del Oeste

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S government employees to: Guadalajara Metropolitan Area, Riviera Nayarit (including Puerto Vallarta), Chapala, and Ajijic.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Mexico City – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Both violent and non-violent crimes occur throughout Mexico City. Use additional caution outside of the frequented tourist areas where police and security patrol more routinely, particularly at night. Petty crime occurs frequently in both tourist areas and non-tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees.

Mexico state (Estado de Mexico) – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Both violent and non-violent crimes are common throughout Mexico state. Use caution in areas outside of the frequented tourist areas, although petty crime occurs frequently in tourist areas as well.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S government employees.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Michoac?n state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime.

Crime and violence are widespread in Michoac?n state. Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Highway 15D: U.S. government employees may travel on Federal Toll Highway (cuota) 15D to transit the state between Mexico City and Guadalajara.
  • Morelia: U.S. government employees may travel by air and by land using Highways 43 or 48D from Highway 15D.
  • Lazaro Cardenas: U.S. government employees must travel by air only and limit activities to the city center or port areas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Morelos state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Morelos state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Nayarit state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Nayarit state. U.S. government employees may not travel to:

  • Tepic
  • San Blas

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S government employees to: Riviera Nayarit (including Nuevo Vallarta, Punta Mita, and Bahia de Banderas), and Santa Maria del Oro.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Nuevo Leon state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and unpredictable gang activity are common in parts of Nuevo Leon state. There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Oaxaca state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees may not travel to:

  • Isthmus region of Oaxaca, defined by Highway 185D to the west, Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca/Chiapas border to the east. This includes the towns of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas Atempa.
  • Highway 200 northwest of Pinotepa.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees to other parts of Oaxaca state, which include tourist areas in: Oaxaca City, Monte Alban, Puerto Escondido, and Huatulco.

Puebla state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Gang-related violence occurs in Puebla state, and is often linked to the organized theft of petroleum and natural gas from the state oil company and other suppliers.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees.

Queretaro state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees.

Quintana Roo state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, occur throughout the state. Most homicides appear to be targeted; however, criminal organization assassinations and turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Quintana Roo state, which include tourist areas in: Cancun, Cozumel, Isla Mujeres, Playa del Carmen, Tulum, and the Riviera Maya.

San Luis Potosi state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and unpredictable gang activity are common in parts of San Luis Potosi state. There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Sinaloa state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime.

Violent crime is widespread. Criminal organizations are based and operating in Sinaloa state.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Mazatlan: U.S. government employees may travel by air or sea only. U.S. government employees are limited to the Zona Dorada and historic town center, and must use direct routes when traveling to and from those locations and the airport and cruise terminals.
  • Los Mochis and Topolobampo: U.S. government employees may travel by air or sea only. U.S. government employees are restricted to the city and the port, and must use direct routes when traveling between these locations and to and from the airport.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Sonora state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Sonora is a key location used by the international drug trade and human trafficking networks.

U.S. government employees traveling to and from Hermosillo may travel between the border crossing points of DeConcini and Mariposa in Nogales only during daylight hours and only on Highway 15, including stops at restaurant/restroom facilities along Highway 15.

U.S. government employees may travel to Puerto Pe?asco via the Lukeville/Sonoyta crossing during daylight hours on Federal Highway 8, or by using Federal Highway 15 south from Nogales and east via Federal Highway 2 and State Highway 37 through Caborca during daylight hours. U.S. government employees may also travel directly from the nearest U.S. Ports of Entry to San Luis Rio Colorado, Cananea, and Agua Prieta but may not go beyond the city limits without official Consulate Nogales clearance.

U.S. government employees may not travel to:

  • The triangular region west of the Mariposa Port of Entry, east of Sonoyta, and north of Altar
  • The district within Nogales that lies to the north of Avenida Instituto Tecnologico and between Periferico (Bulevar Luis Donaldo Colosio) and Corredor Fiscal (Federal Highway 15D), and the residential areas to the east of Plutarco Elias Calles.
  • The eastern edge of the state of Sonora, which borders the state of Chihuahua: all points along that border east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and State Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16.
  • All points south of Federal Highway 16 and east of Highway 15 (south of Hermosillo), as well as Empalme, Guaymas, and all points south, including Obregon and Navojoa. U.S. government employees may travel to Alamos by air only and may not go beyond the city limits.

In addition, U.S. government employees may not use taxi services in Nogales.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Tabasco state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees.

Tamaulipas state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime and kidnapping.

Organized crime activity – including gun battles, murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, forced disappearances, extortion, and sexual assault – is common along the northern border and in Ciudad Victoria. Criminal groups target public and private passenger buses as well as private automobiles traveling through Tamaulipas, often taking passengers hostage and demanding ransom payments. Heavily armed members of criminal groups often patrol areas of the state in marked and unmarked vehicles and operate with impunity particularly along the border region from Reynosa northwest to Nuevo Laredo. In these areas, local law enforcement has limited capability to respond to crime incidents. There are greater law enforcement capabilities in the tri-city area of Tampico, Ciudad Madero, and Altamira, which has a lower rate of violent criminal activity compared to the rest of the state.

U.S. government employees may only travel within a limited radius between the U.S. Consulates in Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros and their respective U.S. Ports of Entry. U.S. government employees may not travel between cities in Tamaulipas using interior Mexican highways and they must observe a curfew between midnight and 6:00 a.m. in the cities of Matamoros and Nuevo Laredo. U.S. government employees can travel between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey only during daylight hours on Highway 85D.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Tlaxcala state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees.

600% Tourism Growth Overwhelms Baja Beach

A Baja California Sur beach has been overwhelmed by growth of more than 600% in visitor numbers over the past six years, prompting authorities to prepare a new management plan that includes charging people to access the protected coastal area.

Located only 20 kilometers from the state capital La Paz, Balandra has been described as the most beautiful beach in Mexico, and it seems many would agree.

Its promotion by state tourism authorities and travel agencies as well as photos and videos of the beach on social media and popular blogs have caused visitor numbers to explode.

“When we started visiting and studying Balandra 30 years ago, there was no tourism,” the state director of the Natural Protected Areas Commission (Conanp), told the newspaper Milenio.

“In 2013, we had 28,000 visitors and we’ll end this year with 200,000,” Benito Bermúdez Almada predicted, which would be a 614% increase.

He said that as many as 2,000 people a day visit the beach.

The massive tourism spike has placed a significant strain on Balandra, the main beach with its own parking lot; Balandra 2, where an iconic mushroom-shaped rock is located; and seven other beaches in the 2,500-hectare protected area.

Too many people in the water is an potential problem.

The good news is that recent testing showed that the water was still well within recommended standards, but one official says, “it’s close to the limit . . . We don’t want to let it get out of hand.”

To mitigate the problem, state and municipal authorities are planning to provide improved washrooms and other sanitary facilities.

Other measures to provide better protection of the beaches will be an increase in the number of park rangers from three to 12 and a ban on vendors from entering the beach. Also planned is an admission fee of 36 pesos, about $2.00, per person per day to enter Balandra Beach.

Balandra Beach is the place to go!

Juicio de El Chapo: el ex presidente mexicano Peña Nieto aceptó un soborno de $ 100 millones, dice un testigo

El ex presidente de México, Enrique Peña Nieto, recibió un soborno de $ 100 millones de Joaquín Guzmán Loera, el infame señor del crimen conocido como El Chapo, según un testigo en el juicio del Sr. Guzmán.

Alex Cifuentes Villa, un narcotraficante colombiano que trabajó estrechamente con el Sr. Guzmán entre el 2007 y el 2013, cuando el jefe del gobierno se escondió de la ley en una serie de ranchos remotos en la Sierra Madre montañas.

“Señor. ¿Guzmán pagó un soborno de $ 100 millones al presidente Peña Nieto? ”Jeffrey Lichtman, uno de los abogados del Sr. Guzmán, preguntó al Sr. Cifuentes durante el interrogatorio.

“Sí”, dijo el señor Cifuentes.

El Sr. Guzmán puede ofrecer más detalles pronto. Poco después de que el jurado fue excusado alrededor de las 4:30 p.m. El martes, el Sr. Lichtman presentó el nombre de su cliente a la fiscalía como posible testigo de la defensa, confirmando que el narcotraficante podría declarar en su propio juicio.

El Sr. Lichtman dijo que agregar el nombre del Sr. Guzmán a la lista de testigos no garantiza que testificará. Es simplemente “posible”.

“Si no lo incluyera en la lista, posiblemente excluiría la posibilidad de que testificara”, dijo Lichtman en una entrevista. “Entonces, solo estaba siendo inclusivo”.

El testimonio del Sr. Guzmán sería un avance sorprendente. Si bien sus lugartenientes han compartido detalles sobre las operaciones del cártel de Sinaloa, el propio capo podría ofrecer información aún más íntima, como por ejemplo, cómo posiblemente sobornó a un presidente de México.

Según el Sr. Cifuentes, el Sr. Peña Nieto contactó al Sr. Guzmán por primera vez cuando fue elegido presidente a fines de 2012, y le pidió al señor de las drogas 250 millones de dólares a cambio de cancelar una persecución a nivel nacional por él.

Pero el Sr. Guzmán hizo una contraoferta, agregó el Sr. Cifuentes, diciendo que le daría al Sr. Peña Nieto solo $ 100 millones.

 “¿El mensaje fue que el Sr. Guzmán no tuvo que permanecer escondido?”, Preguntó el Sr. Lichtman.

“Sí”, dijo el Sr. Cifuentes, “eso es lo que me dijo Joaquín”.

El Sr. Lichtman, citando las notas del Sr. Cifuentes de una entrevista que dio a las autoridades estadounidenses en 2016, preguntó si Felipe Calderón, quien precedió al Sr. Peña Nieto como presidente de México, aceptó un soborno en 2008 de uno de los rivales del Sr. Guzmán, el Beltrán. -Leyva hermanos.

“No recuerdo muy bien este incidente”, respondió el Sr. Cifuentes. Agregó momentos después: “En este momento, no recuerdo eso”.

El Sr. Peña Nieto y el Sr. Calderón no pudieron ser contactados para hacer comentarios.

Después de testificar sobre los dos presidentes, el Sr. Cifuentes recitó otros sobornos que el Sr. Guzmán y sus aliados habían pagado a los funcionarios mexicanos. En al menos dos ocasiones, dijo, el capo le dio al ejército mexicano entre $ 10 millones y $ 12 millones para lanzar operaciones para “matar o capturar” a los asociados de los hermanos Beltrán-Leyva durante su guerra con ellos.

El Sr. Cifuentes también dijo que la policía federal mexicana no solo hizo la vista gorda ante el narcotráfico, sino que ocasionalmente tomó parte en él. Una vez, dijo a los jurados, los traficantes le dieron a la policía fotografías de varias maletas llenas de cocaína que fueron enviadas por el cartel en un avión desde Argentina a México. La policía recogió las maletas del reclamo de equipaje, dijo el Sr. Cifuentes, y vendió las drogas ellos mismos.

Todo esto se produjo en el agotador segundo día del Sr. Cifuentes como testigo en el juicio del Sr. Guzmán. Él ya ha confesado a una asombrosa variedad de crímenes.

En el estrado, el Sr. Cifuentes admitió haber tramado un complot fallido de asesinato con los Ángeles del Infierno en Canadá. Reconoció haber comprado explosivos plásticos a la viuda de un narcotraficante hondureño. Dijo que pagó a un juez en Ecuador $ 500,000 para desechar el caso de un oficial militar ecuatoriano acusado de trabajar con el cartel, y agregó que luego ayudó a secuestrar al oficial cuando parecía que estaba engañando al Sr. Guzmán.

Hubo insultos insinuantes de que los principales líderes mexicanos podrían haber sido comprometidos por dinero sucio desde el inicio del juicio en noviembre. En su declaración de apertura, el Sr. Lichtman afirmó que su cliente había sido enmarcado durante años por una conspiración tramada por su socio, Ismael Zambada García, en liga con agentes de drogas estadounidenses “torcidos” y un gobierno mexicano “completamente corrupto”, incluidos dos de sus miembros. presidentes

En ese momento, el Sr. Peña Nieto y el Sr. Calderón emitieron declaraciones llamando a las acusaciones falsas. El juez del caso, Brian M. Cogan, luego advirtió al Sr. Lichtman contra las promesas al jurado de que las pruebas en el caso no lo respaldarían.

Luego, cuando terminó la primera semana del juicio, los abogados del Sr. Guzmán informaron al juez Cogan en una conferencia lateral que un testigo próximo, Jesús Zambada García, hermano de Ismael Zambada, declararía, si se le preguntaba, que los presidentes mexicanos habían aceptado sobornos. Del cártel de la droga de Sinaloa.

Pero el juez Cogan prohibió el testimonio, citando la vergüenza que causaría a “individuos y entidades” anónimos que no estaban directamente involucrados en el caso.

El martes, sin embargo, el juez Cogan permitió que el Sr. Cifuentes diera testimonio sobre lo que sabía sobre sobornos a los presidentes mexicanos con solo unas pocas interrupciones.

En un momento dado, al ser interrogado por el Sr. Lichtman, el Sr. Cifuentes reconoció que su asistente personal, Andrea Velez Fernández, había trabajado para un consultor político, J.J. Rendón, quien fue contratado por la campaña presidencial del Sr. Peña Nieto. El Sr. Cifuentes dijo que la Sra. Vélez le había enviado una vez fotografías de “maletas llenas de efectivo”.

Cuando el Sr. Lichtman preguntó si las maletas estaban “destinadas al Sr. Peña Nieto”, los fiscales objetaron por su relevancia.

“De acuerdo”, dijo el juez Cogan.

Después de eso, no hubo más discusión de las maletas.

Telephone dialing will become simpler in August

Making phone calls in Mexico will become less complicated next summer with the implementation of a simplified dialing system.

First announced by the Federal Telecommunications Institute7, the new system will standardize phone numbers, making them all 10 digits long.

Starting August 3, dialing a phone number will only require the input of 10 digits, whether the call is local or domestic long distance or eveb connecting to a landline or mobile phone.

The prefixes being phased out include the 01 entered before long-distance calls or non-geographical numbers (01-800 numbers), and 044 and 045, used to make local and long-distance calls to a mobile phone from a landline.

A long-distance call from abroad to a mobile number in Mexico will no longer need the number 1 before the area code.

The new updated system also means that IFT guarantees equal phone number availability for all telecommunications services providers.

The agency said the system will allow for a more streamlined and standardized dialing procedure.

Hasta agosto de 2019 entrará nueva marcación telefónica!

Será hasta el 3 de agosto de 2019 cuando entre en vigor la nueva marcación a celulares y a números de larga distancia, con ello, se homologará a 10 dígitos en el país y se simplificará la forma de hacer llamadas. http://www.milenio.com/negocios/hasta-agosto-de-2019-entrara-nueva-marcacion-telefonica.

De acuerdo con información del Instituto Federal de Telecomunicaciones (Ifetel), a partir de esa fecha se eliminará el 01 para llamadas a números no geográficos y llamadas de larga distancia nacional, así como el 044 para llamadas desde líneas fijas con destino a números nacionales móviles en la modalidad “el que llama paga”.

Asimismo, se dejará de usar el 045 para llamadas de larga distancia nacional desde líneas fijas con destino a números nacionales móviles en la modalidad “el que llama paga nacional”, y el dígito 1 en llamadas entrantes de larga distancia internacional con destino a números móviles en la modalidad “el que llama paga”.

Con el nuevo Plan Técnico Fundamental de Numeración se busca implementar una marcación uniforme a 10 dígitos a nivel nacional, garantizar la disponibilidad de numeración a todos los Proveedores de Servicios de Telecomunicaciones. Así como simplificar y homologar los procedimientos de marcación, y llevar a cabo una administración más eficiente de los recursos numéricos y simplificar los trámites aplicables e implementar trámites electrónicos.

Además, el nuevo plan establece la obligación de utilizar el protocolo de inicio de sesión (SIP, por sus siglas en inglés) para la interconexión a través del Protocolo de Internet, y adecuar los formatos para el intercambio de información de señalización entre redes públicas de telecomunicaciones, como resultado de la implementación de la marcación uniforme a 10 dígitos.

Te recomendamos: Operadores ahora dan más mensajes de texto y Mb por el mismo precio: Ifetel También permitirá una administración más eficiente de los recursos de señalización y simplifica los trámites aplicables e implementa trámites electrónicos. Con la modificación de las Reglas de Portabilidad Numérica se busca atender los cambios que resultan de la emisión de los nuevos Planes de Numeración y Señalización. http://www.milenio.com/negocios/hasta-agosto-de-2019-entrara-nueva-marcacion-telefonica

United States $1.6 Million Reward for Jalisco Cartel Boss!!!

The United States government has doubled the reward being offered for the leader of the Jalisco New Generation Cartel (CJNG).

The attorney general announced yesterday that the State Department would pay up to US $10 million for information leading to the arrest and/or conviction of Nemesio Rubén Oseguera Cervantes, also known as “El Mencho.”

It is one of the highest rewards offered by the department’s Narcotics Rewards Program.

Mexico has offered a 30-million-peso reward (US $1.6 million) for Oseguera.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions told a news conference that the CJNG is “one of the five most dangerous criminal organizations on the face of the earth,” delivering at least four and a half tonnes of cocaine and an equal amount of methamphetamine to the U.S. every month.

Rewards of $5 million are being offered for information about other high-ranking cartel members.

U.S. officials also announced it had unsealed 15 indictments against cartel members accused of conspiring to import drugs into the U.S. and laundering more than $100 million.

“More investigations are ongoing and I expect that there will be many more indictments. We will be relentless against this organization and their affiliates,” Sessions told reporters.

“They are in our crosshairs. This cartel is a top priority.”

En Español

El gobierno estadunidense puso una nueva recompensa por información que lleve a la captura de Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes, El Mencho, líder del cártel de Jalisco Nueva Generación, la cual es de diez millones de dólares.

La recompensa es una de las mayores ofrecidas por el Departamento de Estado de Estados Unidos y duplica a una de 5 millones de dólares ofrecida en marzo.

Con el objetivo de desmantelar la que calificó como la organización criminal más poderosa de México, Estados Unidos también ofreció cinco millones de dólares por Erick Valencia Salazar, El 85, quien el 26 de diciembre de 2017, abandonó la prisión de máxima seguridad de Puente Grande, Jalisco.

El Departamento de Justicia anunció que ha presentado 15 cargos contra miembros del cartel acusados de conspirar para importar drogas a Estados Unidos y lavar dinero por más de 100 millones de dólares.

“Hay más investigaciones en curso y espero que se presenten más acusaciones. Seremos implacables contra esta organización y sus afiliados”, dijo el Fiscal General de Estados Unidos, Jeff Sessions, a periodistas. “Ellos están en nuestra mira. Este cártel es una prioridad”, agregó Sessions.

También reclaman a los cuñados de El Mencho, Abigael González Valencia, líder del grupo de Los Cuinis, quien esta actualmente preso y enfrenta proceso de extradición, y también a José González Valencia.

La recompensa por información que lleve al arresto de Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes, también conocido como “El Mencho”, es una de las mayores ofrecidas por el Departamento de Estado de Estados Unidos y duplica a una de 5 millones de dólares ofrecida en marzo.

Los estadunidenses también quieren a Rubén Oseguera González, El Menchito, hijo de Nemesio, quien se desempeñó como el segundo al mando del CJNG hasta el momento de su arresto por las autoridades mexicanas en junio de 2015.

Oseguera González es acusado de dos cargos. La Corte del distrito de Columbia lo requiere porque entre 2007 y febrero de 2017, realizó una conspiración para distribuir cantidades significativas de narcóticos y por uso de un arma de fuego.

How the NXIVM Sex Cult Infiltrated Mexico

Actress Catherine Oxenberg, whose daughter is or was a member of the NXIVM sex cult, claims that children of four former Mexican presidents are members of the NXIVM cult as well. The cult is accused of branding its female members and using them as sex slaves

Oxenberg has spent the past year trying to bring down the cult after they recruited her 27-year-old daughter, India. She claims its leaders Keith Raniere and Allison Mack tried to infiltrate Mexico.

The controversial group, headquartered in New York, is led by Keith Raniere and his right-hand woman, Allison Mack. They are accused of recruiting women to a secret sub-society within NXIVM in which members were branded.

In her new book, Captive: A Mother’s Crusade to Save Her Daughter from a Terrifying Cult, Oxenberg detailed how NXIVM gained a huge following in Mexico with its popular motivational courses, known as “Executive Success Programs (ESP).”

India Oxenberg

Catherine Oxenberg has spent the past year trying to bring down the NXIVM cult in her attempt to free her 27-year-old daughter India who was has been part of the secret organization for years. She claims that Raniere wanted to infiltrate Mexico for his secret sex cult. “The group was composed of Mexico City’s elite, wealthiest, high-society types,” Oxenberg writes in her book, according to an excerpt obtained by Mexicali MaryAnn.

NXIVM’s Mexican affiliate was headed by Emiliano Salinas, the son of former Mexican president Carlos Salinas. Oxenberg claims Raniere was using Emiliano as a pawn for years in his quest to bring NXIVM to world domination. Moreover, Oxenberg claims, “The children of four former Presidents of Mexico have been involved with ESP.”

Oxenberg claims Raniere was using Emiliano as a pawn for years in his quest to bring NXIVM to world domination. It was happening as Emiliano’s family were grooming him for a political career. “From what I heard from high-ranking defectors, the supposed plan was to get Emiliano into office in Mexico’s next Presidential election in the summer of 2018 so that a top-ranking NXIVM devotee would have power on the world’s political stage,” Oxenberg writes. “His father, Carlos, would use his Machiavellian methods to ensure his son’s election win, and then Keith would use Emiliano as his puppet and rule Mexico.”

However, Emiliano revealed in April 2018 that he had cut all ties with NXIVM.

Men had been signing up for a male’s course in droves, according to Oxenberg.

The Dynasty star says her 27-year-old daughter India was branded with Keith Raniere and Allison Mack’s initials. Pictured above is the branding on one of the women.

“While the men thought that they were being trained to become honorable, noble protectors of humanity, they were being molded to serve as mindless soldiers in Keith’s perverse army—the sole goal of which was to protect Vanguard (Raniere) and his harem,” she wrote.

After she started investigating the group to free her daughter, Oxenberg says she received “threatening letters” from an NXIVM lawyer, as well as a Mexican state attorney general, accusing her of fraud and extortion.

She said the group had such power that one Mexican TV reporter she spoke to begged her not to reveal his name because he feared being killed.

“He wasn’t joking… Not only was he referencing the cult’s potential power in Mexico, because it was populated with so many of the country’s rich, famous, and most elite citizens, but he was also acknowledging the danger that one of those citizens was Emiliano Salinas. His father, Carlos, the most feared man in the country, would do anything for his son,” she wrote.

Raniere had fled to Mexico but was arrested this year and taken to the US to face charges that he, along with an adherent, Smallville actress Allison Mack, coerced followers into becoming sex slaves to senior members.

The controversial group, headquartered in New York, is led by Keith Raniere and his right-hand woman, actress Allison Mack. They are accused of recruiting women to a secret sub-society within NXIVM in which members were branded

“Keith was deported instead of extradited, which would have been the proper protocol,” Oxenberg writes in her book. “There was a worry that the Salinas family would step in and use their government ties to block extradition if they caught wind of it.”

Raniere and Mack have both pleaded not guilty to sex-trafficking charges.

In an interview on NBC that aired just this week, Oxenberg revealed that her daughter India had been branded during her time allegedly as a sex slave, in the cult but that she had finally returned home to her family after seven long years.

It was Orenburg’s fault that her daughter became an alleged NXIVM sex slave. Oxenberg initially took India to a meeting for a NXIVM motivational course back in 2011 after her daughter wanted to try her hand at being an entrepreneur, which is a lame excuse.

While Oxenberg ended up distancing her from the group, India became immersed in the group.

Oxenberg admitted to feeling “horrendous guilt” at having introduced her daughter to the cult in the first place.

“I brought her in. And that’s why I feel responsible for getting her out… At first, I felt horrendous guilt that I had participated in bringing my daughter into an organization that was this deviant and dangerous,” she said.

“Then I started to educate myself… I spoke to numerous experts and they said, “Would you stop blaming yourself? These cults are well-oiled machines. India never stood a chance.”

Was Oxenberg, herself, a sex slave? We have no information on that—perhaps she reveals this in her book, Captive: A Mother’s Crusade to Save Her Daughter from a Terrifying Cult.

Mexico Travel Advisory, Level 2: Exercise increased caution, May 07, 2018

Learn Spanish

We publish this as a service, not just to tourists but for our Mexican friends. Be careful and you should be safe.
Vaya con Dios,
MaryAnn Dogooder.

Exercise increased caution in Mexico due to crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Violent crime, such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery, is widespread.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico as U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to these areas.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from intercity travel after dark in many areas of Mexico. U.S. government employees are also not permitted to drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico with the exception of daytime travel on Highway 15 between Nogales and Hermosillo.

Do not travel to:

  • Colima state due to crime.
  • Guerrero state due to crime.
  • Michoacan state due to crime.
  • Sinaloa state due to crime.
  • Tamaulipas state due to crime.

For all other states in Mexico, please see detailed information below.

If you decide to travel to Mexico:

  • Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving at night.
  • Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Mexico.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Aguascalientes state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling between cities at night. Additionally, U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Aguascalientes.

Baja California state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. According to the Baja California State Secretariat for Public Security, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents.

Due to poor cellular service and hazardous road conditions, U.S. government employees are only permitted to travel on “La Rumorosa” between Mexicali and Tijuana on the toll road during daylight.

There are no U.S. government restrictions in tourist areas in Baja California, which includes: Ensenada, Rosarito, and Tijuana.

Baja California Sur state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. According to Government of Mexico statistics, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents.

There are no U.S. government restrictions for travel in Baja California Sur, which includes the tourist areas of Cabo San Lucas, San Jose del Cabo, and La Paz.

Campeche state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution. Police presence and emergency response are extremely limited outside of the state capital.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Chiapas state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation. U.S. government employees are permitted to drive during daylight only.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees in tourist areas in Chiapas state, such as: Palenque, San Cristobal de las Casas, and Tuxtla Gutierrez.

Chihuahua state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are widespread.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Ciudad Juarez: U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel after dark west of Eje Juan Gabriel and south of Boulevard Zaragoza. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the areas southeast of Boulevard Independencia and the Valle de Juarez region.
  • Within the city of Chihuahua: U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the Morelos, Villa, and Zapata districts.
  • Ojinaga: U.S. government employees must travel via U.S. Highway 67 through the Presidio, Texas port-of-entry.
  • Palomas and the Nuevo Casas Grandes/Paquime region: U.S. government employees must use U.S. Highway 11 through the Columbus, New Mexico port-of- entry.
  • Nuevo Casas Grandes: U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel outside city limits after dark.

Coahuila state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime is widespread. Local law enforcement has limited capability to prevent and respond to crime, particularly in the northern part of the state.

U.S. government employees are not permitted to travel in Coahuila state, with the exception of Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, and Parras de la Fuente. U.S. government employees can only travel to those cities using the most direct routes and maximizing the use of toll highways. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government employees must remain within Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, or Parras de la Fuente.

U.S. government employees are permitted to travel to Piedras Negras and Ciudad Acuna but they must travel to these cities from the United States only.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Coahuila.

Colima state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are widespread.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to Tecoman or within 12 miles of the Colima-Michoac?n border and on Route 110 between La Tecomaca and the Jalisco border.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees travel along Route 200 from the Jalisco border to Manzanillo, including the Manzanillo airport. There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for stays in Manzanillo from Marina Puerto Santiago to Playa las Brisas.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Colima.

Durango state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity along the highways are common.

U.S. government employees may travel outside the city of Durango only during daylight on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government employees must remain within Durango city.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Durango.

Estado de Mexico state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime is common in parts of Estado de Mexico.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the following municipalities, unless they are traveling directly through the municipalities on major thoroughfares:

  • Coacalco
  • Ecatepec
  • Nezahualcoyotl
  • La Paz
  • Valle del Chalco
  • Solidaridad
  • Chalco
  • Ixtapaluca
  • Tlatlaya

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on any roads between Morelos, Huitzilac, and Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Guanajuato state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Guerrero state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the entire state of Guerrero, including Acapulco.

Hidalgo state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Jalisco state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Jalisco state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to areas bordering Michoac?n and Zacatecas states. U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling between cities after dark and from using Highway 80 between Cocula and La Huerta.

U.S. government employees may use federal toll road 15D for travel to Mexico City. However, they may not stop in the towns of La Barca or Ocotlan for any reason.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Jalisco.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for stays in the following tourist areas in Jalisco state: Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta, Chapala, and Ajijic.

Mexico City – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Michoacan state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in Michoac?n state, with the exception of Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas cities and the area north of federal toll road 15D.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel by land, except on federal toll road 15D.

U.S. government employees may fly into Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas.

Morelos state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Morelos state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on any roads from Huitzilac to Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Nayarit state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Nayarit state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in most areas of the state, with the following exceptions:

  • Riviera Nayarit (which includes Nuevo Vallarta and Bahia de Banderas)
  • Santa Maria del Oro
  • Xalisco

When traveling to permitted areas above, U.S. government employees must use major highways and cannot travel between cities after dark.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Nayarit.

Nuevo Leon state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Nuevo Leon state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside Monterrey only during daylight on toll roads, with the exception of travel to the Monterrey airport, which is permitted at any time.

U.S. government employees must remain within San Pedro Garza Garcia or Santa Catarina (south of the Santa Catarina river) municipalities between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Nuevo Leon.

Oaxaca state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

In Oaxaca, U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on Highway 200 throughout the state, except to transit between the airport in Huatulco to hotels in Puerto Escondido and Huatulco.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the El Istmo region. The El Istmo region is defined by Highway 185D to the west, Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca/Chiapas border to the east and includes the towns of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas.

Puebla state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Queretaro state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Quintana Roo state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

According to Government of Mexico statistics, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents injuring or killing bystanders have occurred.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for travel in Quintana Roo state, which includes tourist areas such as: Cancun, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen, Tulum, and the Riviera Maya.

San Luis Potosi state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of San Luis Potosi state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside San Luis Potosi city only during daylight hours on toll roads. U.S. government employees must remain within San Luis Potosi city between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in San Luis Potosi.

Sinaloa state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime is widespread. Criminal organizations are based and operating in Sinaloa state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in most areas of the state. In areas where travel is permitted, the following restrictions are in place:

  • Mazatlan: U.S. government travel is permitted only in Zona Dorada, the historic town center, and direct routes to and from these locations and the airport or the cruise ship terminal.
  • Los Mochis and Port Topolobampo: U.S. government travel is permitted within the city and the port, as well as direct routes to and from these locations and the airport.

Sonora state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Sonora is a key location used by the international drug trade and human trafficking networks. However, northern Sonora experiences much lower levels of crime than cities closer to Sinaloa and other parts of Mexico. U.S. government employees visiting Puerto Pe?asco may use the Lukeville/Sonoyta crossing, and are required to travel during daylight hours on Route 8. U.S. government employees may also travel to Puerto Pe?asco from Nogales by using Route 15 south and east via Routes 2 and 37 through Caborca during daylight hours. U.S. government employees may travel between the cities of Nogales and Hemosillo, however, travel is restricted to daylight hours and only on Route 15 through Imuris, Magdalena, and Santa Ana.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to:

  • The triangular region west of the Mariposa port-of-entry, east of Sonoyta, and north of Altar.
  • The district within Nogales that lies to the north of Ayenida Instituto Tecnologico and between Periferico and Corredor Fiscal, and the residential areas to the east of Plutarco Elias Calles. U.S. government employees are not permitted to use taxi services in Nogales, but bus travel is permitted. Movement around the city after dark is by vehicle only. U.S. government employees should avoid El Centro and all night clubs after 10:00 p.m.
  • The eastern edge of the state of Sonora, which borders the state of Chihuahua (all points along that border east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and state Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16).
  • South of Hermosillo, with the exception of the cities of Alamos, San Carlos, Guaymas, and Empalme.

Travel of U.S. government employees to the following cities is permitted with the noted restrictions:

  • San Luis Rio Colorado: U.S. government employees must travel during daylight hours through the San Luis, Arizona port-of-entry and may not travel beyond the city limits.
  • Cananea: U.S. government employees must travel during daylight hours through the Naco, Arizona port-of-entry and along Route 2 to Cananea, including the Cananea mine, and may not travel beyond the city limits.
  • Agua Prieta: U.S. government employees must travel during daylight hours through the Douglas, Arizona port-of-entry and may not travel beyond the city limits.

Tabasco state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Tamaulipas state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime, such as murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, extortion, and sexual assault, is common. Gang activity, including gun battles, is widespread. Armed criminal groups target public and private passenger buses traveling through Tamaulipas, often taking passengers hostage and demanding ransom payments. Local law enforcement has limited capability to respond to violence in many parts of the state.

U.S. government employees are subject to movement restrictions and a curfew between midnight and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Tamaulipas.

Tlaxcala state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Veracruz state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation. U.S. government employees are permitted to drive during daylight only.

Yucatan state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution. Police presence and emergency response are extremely limited outside of the state capital.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for travel in Yucatan state, which includes tourist areas such as: Chichen Itza, Merida, Uxmal, and Valladolid.

Zacatecas state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Zacatecas state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside Zacatecas city only during daylight hours on toll roads. U.S. government employees must remain within Zacatecas city between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Zacatecas.