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Baja California Safer than California

Sinapsis Café

Sinapsis Café – Republica de Argentina 298 Mexicali Baja California, Tel. +52 686 565 6167, Hours 4 – 11pm

Tourists are safer in Baja California than in California, according to a comment by Baja California’s tourism secretary in an appearance before the state Congress in Mexicali.

Óscar Escobedo Carignan made the assertion in response to lawmakers’ questions about insecurity in Baja California.

“We had 27 million tourists last year, just over 16 million were from the other side [the United States]. There were two incidents that shouldn’t have happened, but [in terms] of the international numbers . . . they’re practically nonexistent,” he added.

Congressman Bernardo Padilla, who is also a member of the state’s Public Security, Civil Protection and Tourism Commission, questioned Escobedo about comments made by internationally renowned chef Javier Plascencia in relation to the security situation in Tijuana.

“The voice of chef Plascencia concerns me because it resonates in the gastronomic sector at an international level. He said he was nervous about bringing public figures to Baja California.”

Escobedo responded by recognizing the problem but stressed it wasn’t confined to Baja California.

“What is happening is regrettable [and] concerning. He mentioned Tijuana but, it’s in tourist destinations in the whole country like Cancún, Quintana Roo, or Los Cabos, Baja California Sur,” he said.

There have been 1,365 homicides recorded in Tijuana this year as of yesterday while rising crime and violence in Baja California Sur have been blamed for hotel cancellations in destinations such as Los Cabos.

Meanwhile, federal Tourism Secretary Enrique de la Madrid ruled out the possibility that an updated travel warning issued by the United States Department of State in August would affect Mexico’s chances of becoming the world’s seventh most visited country.

Mexico is currently the world’s eighth most popular destination, according to the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO).

Growing violence and insecurity will also not affect Mexico’s tourism growth, de la Madrid said, stressing that the dangers of travel to Mexico for overseas visitors were minimal.

“The chances that you, as a foreigner, are affected [by insecurity] are frankly very low,” he declared at a tourism event in Cancún yesterday.

He also called on Mexicans to stop branding the country as unsafe because of the negative effect it will have on tourism.

“If we manage to convince the world that we are an unsafe country, someday we are going to pay for it with fewer tourists, less employment and less progress,” de la Madrid said.

Twenty-six million international tourists arrived in the first eight months of 2017, representing a 12% increase over the same period in 2016 while a total of 35 million international tourists visited Mexico last year, up 50% on 2012 figures.

Increases in visitors from Argentina, Brazil, France and Canada were all cited by the tourism secretary while he also said that more Mexicans are choosing to vacation at home.

De la Madrid also made his own comparison to the relative safety of tourists in Mexico compared to the United States and beyond.

“In Mexico, we don’t have insecurity where one person guns down more than 50 people at a concert . . . We don’t have insecurity where you’re walking down a European street and a terrorist comes and shoots people who are drinking coffee . . ..”

“In Mexico the insecurity we have, unfortunately, most of it has to do with . . . criminal groups competing among themselves to gain [control] of a plaza.” In other words, tourists are not part of the equation when it comes to criminal groups in Baja California, or even in all of Mexico.

However, out of service to our readers, below is the U.S. Department of State, Mexico Travel Warning.

Mexico Travel Warning

Last Updated: August 22, 2017

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling to certain parts of Mexico due to the activities of criminal organizations in those areas.  U.S. citizens have been the victims of violent crimes, including homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery in various Mexican states. This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico issued December 8, 2016.

For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, see our state-by-state assessments below. U.S. government personnel and their families are prohibited from personal travel to all areas to which the Department recommends “defer non-essential travel” in this Travel Warning. As a result of security precautions that U.S. government personnel must take while traveling to parts of Mexico, our response time to emergencies involving U.S. citizens may be hampered or delayed.

Gun battles between rival criminal organizations or with Mexican authorities have taken place on streets and in public places during broad daylight. The Mexican government dedicates substantial resources to protect visitors to major tourist destinations and has engaged in an extensive effort to counter criminal organizations that engage in narcotics trafficking and other unlawful activities throughout Mexico. There is no evidence that criminal organizations have targeted U.S. citizens based on their nationality. Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the level of drug-related violence and crime that are reported in the border region or in areas along major trafficking routes.

U.S. government personnel are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in the states of Coahuila, Durango, Zacatecas, Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosi, Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas, Jalisco, Colima, and Nayarit.

Kidnappings in Mexico take the following forms:

  • Traditional:  victim is physically abducted and held captive until a ransom is paid for release.
  • Express:  victim is abducted for a short time and commonly forced to withdraw money, usually from an ATM, then released.
  • Virtual:  an extortion-by-deception scheme where a victim is contacted by phone and coerced by threats of violence to provide phone numbers of family and friends, and then isolated until the ransom is paid.  Recently, hotel guests have been targets of such “virtual” kidnapping schemes.

U.S. citizens have been murdered in carjackings and highway robberies, most frequently at night and on isolated roads. Carjackers use a variety of techniques, including roadblocks, bumping/moving vehicles to force them to stop, and running vehicles off the road at high speeds. There are indications that criminals target newer and larger vehicles, but drivers of old sedans and buses coming from the United States are also targeted. U.S. government personnel are not permitted to drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from intercity travel after dark in many areas of Mexico. U.S. citizens should use toll roads (cuotas) whenever possible. In remote areas, cell phone coverage is limited or non-existent.

The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat organized criminal groups.  U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways by car or bus may encounter government checkpoints, staffed by military or law enforcement personnel. In some places, criminal organizations have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms, and have killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them. You should cooperate at all checkpoints.

State-by-State Assessment: Below is a state-by-state assessment of security conditions throughout Mexico. Travelers should be mindful that even if no advisories are in effect for a given state, U.S. citizens should exercise caution throughout Mexico as crime and violence can still occur. For general information about travel and other conditions in Mexico, see our Country Specific Information.

Aguascalientes: Intercity travel at night is prohibited for U.S. government personnel.

Baja California (includes Tijuana, Rosarito, Ensenada, Tecate, and Mexicali): Exercise caution in the northern state of Baja California, particularly at night. Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. According to the Baja California State Secretariat for Public Security, the state of Baja California experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents injuring innocent bystanders have occurred during daylight hours. Due to poor cellular service and general road conditions, U.S. government personnel are only allowed to travel on “La Rumorosa” between Mexicali-Tijuana on the toll road during daylight hours.

Baja California Sur (includes Los Cabos and La Paz): Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. Exercise caution as Baja California Sur continues to experience a high rate of homicides. According to Government of Mexico statistics, the state of Baja California Sur experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents, in which innocent bystanders have been injured, have occurred during daylight hours.

Campeche: No advisory is in effect.

Chiapas (includes Palenque and San Cristobal de las Casas): U.S. government personnel must remain in tourist areas and are not allowed to use public transportation.

Chihuahua (includes Ciudad Juarez, the city of Chihuahua, Ojinaga, Palomas, Nuevo Casas Grandes and Copper Canyon): Criminal activity and violence remains an issue throughout the state of Chihuahua and its major cities. If you plan to drive in the state of Chihuahua, you should limit travel to daylight hours on major highways and follow the recommendations below.

  • Ciudad Juarez: Exercise caution in all areas. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling after dark west of Eje Juan Gabriel and south of Boulevard Zaragoza. Defer non-essential travel to the areas southeast of Boulevard Independencia and the Valle de Juarez region.
  • Within the city of Chihuahua: Defer non-essential travel to the Morelos, Villa, and Zapata districts, where the travel of U.S. government personnel is restricted.
  • Ojinaga: Travel via U.S. Highway 67 through the Presidio, Texas port-of-entry.
  • Palomas and the Nuevo Casas Grandes/Paquime region: Use U.S. Highway 11 through the Columbus, New Mexico port-of- entry.
  • Nuevo Casas Grandes: U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling outside of city limits after dark.
  • Copper Canyon and other areas of the state of Chihuahua: U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel.

Coahuila: U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to Coahuila, with the exception of Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, and Parras de la Fuente, because of the high incidence of violent crime, particularly along the highways between Piedras Negras and Nuevo Laredo. State and municipal law enforcement capacity is limited in some parts of Coahuila, particularly in the north. U.S. government personnel are allowed to travel during daylight hours to Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, and Parras de la Fuente, using the most direct routes and maximizing the use of toll highways. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, or Parras de la Fuente.

Colima (includes Manzanillo): U.S. government personnel are prohibited from intercity travel at night, from traveling within 12 miles of the Colima-Michoacán border, and from traveling on Route 110 between La Tecomaca and the Jalisco border. U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to this border region, including the city of Tecoman.

Durango: Violence and criminal activity along the highways are a continuing security concern. U.S. government personnel may travel outside of the city of Durango only during daylight hours on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within the city of Durango.

Estado de Mexico (includes Toluca and Teotihuacan): U.S. citizens should defer all non-essential travel to the municipalities of Coacalco, Ecatepec, Nezahualcoyotl, La Paz, Valle del Chalco, Solidaridad, Chalco, Ixtapaluca, and Tlatlaya due to high rates of crime and insecurity, unless traveling directly through the areas on major thoroughfares. Avoid traveling on any roads between Huitzilac, Morelos, and Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Guanajuato (includes San Miguel de Allende and Leon): No advisory is in effect.

Guerrero (includes Acapulco, Ixtapa, Taxco, and Zihuatanejo): Personal travel to the entire state of Guerrero, including Acapulco, is prohibited for U.S. government personnel. Self-defense groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Armed members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and, although not considered hostile to foreigners or tourists, are suspicious of outsiders and should be considered volatile and unpredictable.

Hidalgo: No advisory is in effect.

Jalisco (includes Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta, and Lake Chapala): U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to areas that border the states of Michoacán and Zacatecas because of continued instability. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from personal travel to areas of Jalisco that border Zacatecas, intercity travel after hours, and from using Highway 80 between Cocula and La Huerta. U.S. government personnel are authorized to use Federal toll road 15D for travel to Mexico City; however, they may not stop in the town of La Barca or Ocotlan for any reason.

Mexico City (formerly known as the Federal District): No advisory is in effect.

Michoacan (includes Morelia): U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to the state of Michoacan, except the cities of Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas, and the area north of federal toll road 15D. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling by land in Michoacan except on federal toll road 15D during daylight hours. Flying into Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas is permitted for U.S. government personnel.

Morelos (includes Cuernavaca): U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel on any roads between Huitzilac in the northwest corner of the state and Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Nayarit (includes the Riviera Nayarit coast, including the cities of Tepic, Xalisco, and San Blas): U.S. government personnel may travel to Riviera Nayarit, San Blas, Santa María del Oro, Tepic, and Xalisco using major highways. Intercity travel at night is prohibited for U.S. government personnel. Defer non-essential travel to other areas of the state.

Nuevo Leon (includes Monterrey): U.S. government personnel may travel outside the city of Monterrey only during daylight hours on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within the municipal boundaries of San Pedro Garza Garcia or Santa Catarina (south of the Santa Catarina river). Travel to and from Monterrey airport is permitted at any time.

Oaxaca (includes Oaxaca, Huatulco, and Puerto Escondido): U.S. government personnel must remain in tourist areas and are not allowed to use public transportation in Oaxaca City. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling on Highway 200 throughout the state, except to transit between the airport in Huatulco to hotels in Puerto Escondido and Huatulco, and they are not permitted to travel to the El Istmo region. The El Istmo region is defined by Highway 185D to the west, Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca/Chiapas border to the east and includes the towns of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas.

Puebla: No advisory is in effect.

Queretaro: No advisory is in effect.

Quintana Roo (includes Cancun, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen, Riviera Maya, and Tulum): U.S. citizens should be aware that according to Government of Mexico statistics, the state of Quintana Roo experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents, in which innocent bystanders have been injured or killed, have occurred.

San Luis Potosi: U.S. government personnel may travel outside the city of San Luis Potosi only during daylight hours on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within the city of San Luis Potosi.

Sinaloa (includes Mazatlan): One of Mexico’s most powerful criminal organizations is based in the state of Sinaloa, and violent crime rates remain high in many parts of the state. Defer non-essential travel to the state of Sinaloa, except the cities of Mazatlan, Los Mochis, and the Port of Topolobampo. Travel in Mazatlan should be limited to Zona Dorada, the historic town center, as well as direct routes to and from these locations and the airport. Travel in Los Mochis and Topolobampo is restricted to the city and the port, as well as direct routes to/from these locations and the airport.

Sonora (includes Nogales, Puerto Peñasco, Hermosillo, and San Carlos): Sonora is a key region in the international drug and human trafficking trades. U.S. citizens traveling throughout Sonora are encouraged to limit travel to main roads during daylight hours and exercise caution on the Highway 15 corridor from Nogales to Empalme. Puerto Peñasco should be visited using the Lukeville, Arizona/Sonoyta, Sonora border crossing, and limit driving to daylight hours.

Due to illegal activity, U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to:

  • The triangular region west of Nogales, east of Sonoyta, and north of Caborca (including the towns of Saric, Tubutama, and Altar).
  • The eastern edge of the state of Sonora, which borders the state of Chihuahua (all points along that border east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and state Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16).
  • South of Hermosillo, with the exception of the cities of Alamos, Guaymas, and Empalme.  Defer non-essential travel east of Highway 15, within the city of Ciudad Obregon, and south of the city of Navojoa.

Tabasco (includes Villahermosa): No advisory is in effect.

Tamaulipas (includes Matamoros, Nuevo Laredo, Reynosa, and Tampico): U.S. citizens should defer all non-essential travel to the state of Tamaulipas due to violent crime, including homicide, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, extortion, and sexual assault. The number of reported kidnappings in Tamaulipas is among the highest in Mexico. State and municipal law enforcement capacity is limited to nonexistent in many parts of Tamaulipas. Violent criminal activity occurs more frequently along the northern border and organized criminal groups may target public and private passenger buses traveling through Tamaulipas. These groups sometimes take all passengers hostage and demand ransom payments.  U.S. government personnel are subject to movement restrictions and a curfew between midnight and 6 a.m. Matamoros, Reynosa, Nuevo Laredo, and Ciudad Victoria have experienced numerous gun battles and attacks with explosive devices in the past year.

Tlaxcala: No advisory is in effect.

Veracruz: U.S. government personnel must remain in tourist areas and are not allowed to use public transportation. Road travel should be limited to daylight hours only.

Yucatan (includes Merida and Chichen Itza): No advisory is in effect.

Zacatecas: U.S. government personnel may travel outside the city of Zacatecas only during daylight hours on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government personnel must abide by the Embassy-imposed curfew and remain within the city of Zacatecas.

For further information:

  • See the State Department’s travel website for the Worldwide Caution, Travel Warnings, Travel Alerts, and Country Specific Information for Mexico.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Contact the U.S. Embassy in Mexico, located at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, at +52-55-5080- 2000 x4440, (5080-2000 for calls in Mexico City, 01-55-5080-2000 for long distance calls in Mexico) 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.  After- hours emergency number for U.S. citizens is +52-55-5080-2000.
  • Call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Embassies & Consulates

 

U.S. Embassy Mexico City
Paseo de la Reforma 305
Colonia Cuauhtemoc
06500 Mexico, D.F.
Telephone: 
011-52-55-5080-2000
Emergency Telephone: 01-55-5080-2000, extension 0
Fax: 011-52-55-5080-2201
acsmexicocity@state.gov
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CONSULATESU.S. Consulate General Ciudad Juarez 
Paseo de la Victoria #3650
Fracc. Partido Senecú
Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico
Telephone:
 (011) (52) (656) 227-3000
Emergency Telephone: (656) 215-0725 (If calling from a Ciudad Juarez phone dial 044 before the number. From other parts in Mexico dial 045 before the number. From the U.S. dial 011- 521 before the number.)
cdjamericancitizens@state.gov
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U.S. Consulate General Guadalajara 
Progreso 175
Col. Americana
Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
Telephone:
 (01-33 ) 3268-2100 (from Mexico) / 011-52-33-3268-2100 (from U.S.)
Emergency Telephone: (01-33) 3268-2145 (from Mexico) / 011-52-33-3268-2145 (from U.S)
Fax: (01-33 ) 3826-6549 (from Mexico) / 011-52-33-3826-6549 (from U.S.)
acsgdl@state.gov
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U.S. Consulate General Hermosillo 
Monterrey #141 entre las calles
Rosales y Galeana
Col. Esqueda, C.P. 83000
Hermosillo, Sonora, México
Telephone:
 01-662-289-3500 (from Mexico) / 011-52-662-289-3500 (from U.S.)
Emergency Telephone: 044-662-256-0741 (local calls) / 045-662-256-0741 (within Mexico) / +52-1-662-256-0741 (international)
hermoacs@state.gov
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U.S. Consulate General Matamoros 
Calle Primera #2002
Colonia Jardín
Matamoros, Tamaulipas
México 87330
Telephone:
 011-52-(868)-812-4402
Emergency Telephone: 044-(868)-818-1507 (within Matamoros) / 045-(868)-818-1507 (outside Matamoros) / 011-52-1-(868)-818-1507 (from U.S.)
Fax: 011-52-(868)-812-2171
MatamorosUSCitizens@state.gov
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U.S. Consulate General Merida 
Calle 60 No. 338-K x 29 y 31
Col. Alcala Martin
Merida, Yucatan, Mexico 97050

Telephone: From the U.S. 011-52-999-942-5700 / within Mexico 01-999-942-5700 / within Merida 942-5700
Emergency Telephone: 011-52-999-942-5700 (from the U.S.) / 01-999-942-5700 (within Mexico) / 942-5700 (within Merida)
Fax: 011-52-999-942-5758 (from the U.S.)
meridacons@state.gov
The Consulate in Merida provides consular services for the three Mexican states of Yucatan, Quintana Roo and Campeche.

U.S. Consulate General Monterrey
Ave. Constitución 411 Pte.
Monterrey, Nuevo León. México 64000
Telephone:
 (81) 8047-3100
Emergency Telephone: (81)8362-9126 (from Mexico) / 011-52-1-81-8362-9126 (from the U.S.)
Fax: (81) 8342-5433
MonterreyACS@state.gov
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U.S. Consulate General Nogales 
Calle San José s/n
Fraccionamiento los Alamos
C. P. 84065 Nogales, Sonora.
Mexico
Telephone:
 (52)-(631)-311-8150
Emergency Telephone: (521)-(631)-318-0723
Fax: (52)-(631)-313-4652
nogalesACS@state.gov
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U.S. Consulate General Nuevo Laredo 
Calle Allende 3330, Col. Jardin
Nuevo Laredo, Mexico
Telephone: From Mexico:
 (867) 714-0512, ext. 3128 (If calling from the U.S., dial 01152 before the number)
Emergency Telephone: 044-867-727-2797
Fax: (867) 714-0512, ext. 3197 (from Mexico) / 011-52-867-714-0512, ext. 3197 (from U.S.)
NuevoLaredo-ACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate Tijuana 
Paseo de las Culturas s/n
Mesa de Otay
Delegación Centenario C.P. 22425
Tijuana, Baja California
Mexico
Telephone:
 (664) 977-2000 (Dialing from the U.S. 011-52 + phone number)
Emergency Telephone: 001 (619) 692-2154 (from Mexico) / (619) 692-2154 (from the U.S.)
ACSTijuana@state.gov
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U.S. Consular Agent – Acapulco
Hotel Continental Emporio
Costera M. Alemán 121 – Office 14
Acapulco, Gro. 39670
Mexico

Telephone: (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300
Emergency Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City.
Fax: (52) (744) 484-0300

U.S. Consular Agent –
Las Tiendas de Palmilla L-B221
Km. 27.5 Carretera Transpeninsular
San José del Cabo, B.C.S. 23406
Mexico
Telephone:
 (624) 143-3566
Emergency Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Consulate General in Tijuana.
Fax: (624) 143-6750
Monday-Friday: 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

U.S. Consular Agent – Cancun
Blvd. Kukulcan Km 13 ZH
Torre La Europea, Despacho 301
Cancun, Quintana Roo, Mexico
Telephone: 
(011)(52)(999) 942-5700
Emergency Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Consulate General in Merida.
Fax: (998) 883-1373
The U.S. Consular Agency in Cancun is open for business Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 1:00 pm. An appointment is required for all services.

U.S. Consular Agent – Cozumel
Plaza Villa Mar en El Centro, Plaza Principal, (Parque Juárez between Melgar and 5th Ave.)
2nd floor, Locales #8 and 9
Cozumel, QR. 77600
Mexico
Telephone:
 (011)(52)(987) 872-4574
Emergency Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Consulate General in Merida.
Fax: (52) (987) 872-6662

U.S. Consular Agent – Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo
Hotel Fontan
Blvd. Ixtapa s/n,
40880 Ixtapa, Gro.
Mexico

Telephone: (011)(52)(755) 553-2100
Emergency Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City.
Fax: (52) (755) 553-2772

U.S. Consular Agent – Mazatlán
Playa Gaviotas No. 202
Zona Dorada
Mazatlán, Sinaloa 82110
Mexico
Telephone:
 (011)(52)(818) 047-3145
Emergency Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Consulate General in Hermosillo.
General Business hours: Monday thru Friday from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm.
ConAgencyMazatlan@state.gov

U.S. Consular Agent – Oaxaca
Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Office 20
Oaxaca, Oax. 68000
Mexico
Telephone:
 (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853
Emergency Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City.
Fax: (52) (951) 516-2701

U.S. Consular Agent – Piedras Negras
Abasolo #211, Local #3
Centro
26000 Piedras Negras, Coahuila
Mexico
Telephone:
 (011)(52)(878) 782-5586 or (011)(52)(878) 782-8664
Emergency Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Consulate General in Nuevo Laredo.
Fax: (52) (878) 782-8707
Monday-Friday: 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

U.S. Consular Agent – Puerto Vallarta
Paseo de Los Cocoteros 85 Sur
Paradise Plaza – Local L-7
Nuevo Vallarta, Nayarit C.P
Mexico
Telephone:
 (011)(52)(322) 222-0069

U.S. Consular Agent – Reynosa
(Inside the Holiday Inn Hotel)
Calle Emilio Portes Gil #703
Colonia Prado Sur
Reynosa, México 88560
Telephone: 
(011)(52) (899)-921-6530
Emergency Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Consulate General in Matamoros.
Fax: (899)-921-6531
General Business Hours for American Citizens: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
VeraVN@state.gov

U.S. Consular Agent – San Luis Potosi
Edificio “Las Terrazas”
Ave. Venustiano Carranza 2076-41
Col. Polanco
San Luis Potosi, S.L.P., 78220
Mexico
Telephone:
 (01-444) 811-7802 (from Mexico) / 011-52-444-811-7802 (from U.S.)
Emergency Telephone: (045-444) 829-9198 (from Mexico) or 011-52-1-444-829-9198 (from the United States)
Fax: (01-444) 811-7803 (from Mexico) / 011-52-444-811-7803 (from U.S.)
The Consular Agency is open to the public from 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM Monday through Friday except for U.S. and Mexican holidays.

U.S. Consular Agent – San Miguel de Allende
Dr. Hernandez Macías No. 72
San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato
Mexico
Telephone:
 (011)(52)(415) 152-2357
Emergency Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City.
Fax: (52) (415) 152-1588
Monday-Thursday: 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
clancyek@state.gov

 

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