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The US Border Patrol chases Jim

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The sandy riverbank where Jim & Rex would walk

The sandy riverbank where Jim & Rex would walk

Just across the street from our place is a bare sandy field that stretches north about 80 yards to a small green river. The river is about 50 feet across, and on the other side is the United States. It’s a very nice place for bicycle rides and jogging, or just to sit and watch the river go by.

The new US steel wall

The new US steel wall

It had become a favorite place for Jim to take Rex for a long walk, or a brief jog. All of a sudden the sandy field and the river were gone – blocked off by a huge ugly 20 foot steel wall right by the side of the street.

One day, there was no wall; the next there it was. Just like that.

Working on the steel wall

Working on the steel wall

Jim and I were amazed at how fast the thing appeared, and got in our truck to check it out. It turns out that the sandy riverside where Jim and Rex used to spend time was not Mexico, but America. They were walking and jogging in America and didn’t even realize it.

Apparently, there was no need to wall off anything because of the river. Now times had changed, I guess.
We drove down the street, which was now all closed in by a big ugly wall. Down the road aways, the wall ended. Jim stopped the truck to take a look. On the other side were sections of steel stacked and ready to be put in place. With all that heavy steel, the thing must cost a fortune to build. There were men, trucks and equipment, all working very fast to build the wall.

As soon as Jim started taking some photos, the people working to put up the wall ran and hid behind their trucks and equipment. Did they think Jim was some kind of terrorist? Did they think that if he got their photo, they were marked for death? Maybe so, because as Jim started walking over to talk to the folks – off in the distance two trucks started speeding towards him – one was a US Border Patrol truck, and the other, the Mexican police. All of a sudden another US Border Patrol truck came over the hill at Jim.

Mexican police (left) and US border patrol bearing down on Jim

Mexican police (left) and US border patrol bearing down on Jim

I saw the whole thing, and was scared to death. Jim turned and ran back to the truck as fast as he could. He hopped in and we were off, and down some side streets as fast as the truck could safely take us, just like some kind of international terrorists, or whatever.

Luckily, we were not followed, or at least they didn’t catch us. I have no idea what they would have done to Jim had they caught him. At the very least I am sure it would have been goodbye to our one and only camera.

Once we were safe, Jim got boiling mad, “What do those @#^%$ guys think I am – some sort of a Commie or something!” Jim always hated Communists and enemies of America, and even on the off chance of being considered one of them was too much for him to take.

Now Jim and I are true blue, and I mean it. But what is there to gain, other than making some contractor rich, by putting up that ugly steel wall, which is completely useless? That riles even me.

For years, the river had kept America safe – and there had even been an American border wall on the other side of the river.

The new wall must make lot of people in Mexicali angry, especially those along the street, who had the ugly thing staring them straight in the face.  Many of them were sitting in front of their houses watching the thing go up.

Getting chased by the US Border Patrol – our own guys – certainly brought Jim to a burn.

And guess what? Later we learned that the steel wall went all the way to Yuma, Arizona – some 50 plus miles to the east – even through empty desert.

The next day, in the afternoon, we drove by to check on the wall again. Wow! The whole thing was completed, and I mean about a mile of it! This put Jim in a good mood and he said, “Guess I frightened those suckers so much they got the whole thing done in a day, and vamoosed.”

Now, Jim was the winner, but only in a way. Jim’s good times with Rex on that nice sandy stretch of land along the river were gone forever.

1 comment to The US Border Patrol chases Jim

  • Thanks for giving us a glimpse of life along the border — and a first-hand report of the fence going up there. Sorry to hear Jim’s jogging area got repossessed! What an adventure.

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